Landscape Patterns and Ecosystem Processes

2008 US-IALE Symposium

Madison, Wisconsin | April 6-10, 2008

statues
Capitol Dome sculptures - © Michael Morse

US-IALE 2008 Workshop Overview

All workshops will take place on Sunday, April 6th, 2008.
All workshops will require a minimum of 12 registrants.


Full-Day Workshops


Half-Day Workshops




An Introduction to Landscape Genetics for Non-geneticists

 

Time: 8:00 am - 5:00 pm (1 hour lunch break, lunch not provided)
Cost: $75.00
Organizers: Lisette Waits and Niko Balkenhol (University of Idaho)
Location: Pyle Center, 702 Langdon Street


Landscape genetics combines population genetics, landscape ecology, and spatial statistics, and seeks to explain the influences of landscape composition and configuration on genetic diversity and structure.  This emerging field could greatly enhance our understanding of species-specific landscape ecology, for example with respect to functional connectivity or corridor design. In this workshop, we will introduce non-geneticists (e.g., landscape ecologists) to population genetic principles, and provide them with an overview of the most commonly used methods for measuring gene flow and detecting genetic population structure.  Such analyses are the first step in landscape genetics, and a good understanding of the different approaches and the unique characteristics of genetic data is critical for landscape ecologists who plan to do research in this new field.  While the focus of the workshop is on these preliminary steps of landscape genetics, we will also introduce participants to the most commonly used methods for linking genetic variation and landscape patterns (the second step of landscape genetics).

Detailed workshop description …




Eco-hydrology Quantification using FRAGSTATS and a Flow-patch Analysis Approach


This workshop has been cancelled.


Time: 8:00 am - 5:00 pm (1 hour lunch break, lunch not provided)
Cost: $50.00
Organizer: Richard Koehler (NOAA, National Weather Service)
Location: Pyle Center, 702 Langdon Street
Note: Participants should bring their own PC laptop computer.


Raster hydrographs offer an innovative approach to examining intra- and inter-annual variations in streamflow.  In a gridded environment, years are plotted as rows and days of the water year are plotted as columns, with the magnitude of a grid cell being streamflow.   The resulting raster graphic can be interpreted much like a map, with patches and discontinuities representing seasonal and annual hydrologic patterns.  Flow-patch analysis offers a new and innovative approach for the visualization and quantification of streamflow records by analyzing the raster hydrograph using some of the tools of fragmentation analysis in landscape ecology. This technique permits new insights into characteristics and disturbances of hydrologic properties and provides additional tools to aquatic ecologists and scientists studying the physical hydrologic environment. This approach also allows hydrologic properties to be put into landscape ecology terms. This workshop is designed to instruct participants how to create and interpret temporal patterns in streamflow records. Quantification of patterns based on landscape metrics using FRAGSTATS is demonstrated.

Detailed workshop description …




Applying for Fellowships and Grants: Tips from the Pros


Time: 8:00 am - 12:00 pm
Cost: Free
Organizers: Deahn DonnerWright (USDA Forest Service, North Central Research Station) and Martin Simard (UW-Madison)
Location: Pyle Center, 702 Langdon Street
Note: This workshop is organized by the US-IALE Graduate Student Representatives


This workshop will provide fellowship and grant writing insights from successful grant writers in the landscape ecology community.  Speakers will talk about their experience with the grant writing process, and also about their perspective as reviewers of fellowship and grant applications. Topics will include the fellowship application process and what reviewers look for in a fellowship application, how to match research ideas to those of granting agencies, how to avoid common mistakes made by beginning grant writers and fellowship applicants, how to develop team proposals, and how to work with the administration office when developing the proposal budget.  Participants will gain a better understanding of the fellowship application and grant writing process that will increase the chances of landscape perspective research getting funded.  We invite graduate students, post doctoral fellows, early career faculty, and other interested individuals to participate.

Detailed workshop description …




Landscape Modeling: a How-to Guide


Time: 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Cost: $25.00
Organizers: Erica A. H. Smithwick (Penn State) and Daniel B. Collins (UW-Madison)
Location: Geography computer lab, Science Hall, 550 N. Park Street


In this workshop, we will explore the utility of landscape models for informing the central challenge of landscape and ecosystem ecology: understanding the causes and consequences of landscape pattern at various scales.  We will examine the diversity of current landscape modeling approaches and methods, their utility for answering different questions in landscape ecology, and their evolving role at the intersection of geography, geomorphology, hydrology, and ecosystem ecology. At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to think through all aspects of a modeling project, from reading a modeling paper critically, to designing a model and experimental procedure, and writing a superior modeling paper. Through handouts, group modeling exercises (in Excel), and discussions, we will help participants develop the skills necessary to include landscape models in their scientific teaching and research.  All skill levels are welcome and will be accommodated.

Detailed workshop description …




Digital Data in Landscape Ecology: Applications and Visions


Time: 8:00 am - 12:00 pm
Cost: $25.00
Organizer: Falk Huettmann (University of Alaska-Fairbanks)
Location: Forestry computer lab, Russell labs, 1630 Linden Drive


With the explosion of digital data availability and increases in computational power that allow landscape ecologists to analyze larger and larger spatial data sets, the amount of data being collected, stored and shared has become vast.These developments offer the possibility of creating an online global village in which data and insights can be used worldwide in landscape-level decision-making, especially in less developed areas where access to data may be more limited.  Furthermore, federal funding agencies now require PIs to make their data widely available to other scientists; thus, all of us need to build this step into our research programs.  Open Access online initiatives present a fascinating approach for reaching the goal of global online data sharing efficiently.  This workshop will cover topics involved in data sharing including established data sharing policies, currently available on-line databases relevant to Landscape Ecology, open source initiatives, and metadata standards, tools and mark-up languages (e.g. XML).

Detailed workshop description …




Modern Approaches to Resource Selection Modeling


Time: 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Cost: $25.00
Organizers: James Forester (University of Chicago) and Jacqueline Frair (SUNY ESF)
Location: Forestry computer lab, Russell labs, 1630 Linden Drive


Ecologists have long sought to understand how individuals and populations use heterogeneous landscapes. In particular, one goal of ecological research has been to determine what combinations of landscape characteristics attract or repel animals .  This provides insights necessary to define more carefully the habitat requirements of (and interactions among) species. Statistical models that describe habitat preference typically rely upon discrete locations of individual animals combined with spatially explicit data on landscape covariates. The abundance of GPS and land-cover data allows researchers to address previously inaccessible questions relating to how animals use resources at multiple spatial and temporal scales. The overall goal of this workshop is to provide hands-on experience to researchers interested in developing resource selection models using cutting-edge techniques.

Detailed workshop description …

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